Don’t Leave Your Dog In A Parked Car

Don’t Leave Your Dog In A Parked Car
Don’t Leave Your Dog In A Parked Car

Never leave an animal in a parked car.

We’ve heard this before, and it bears repeating. Please do not leave your dog or any animal for that matter in a parked car despite cracking the windows under the shade. While the temps outside are still hot, pet owners must stay diligent with their animals.

We must think of caring for our dogs like a child. For example, would you leave your child in a parked car with the windows cracked on a warm day?

No, you would not.

Here are more critical facts to remember. After all, arming yourself with knowledge is the best information of all.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, also known as NOAA, reported some vital statistical data. Cracking the windows to a motor vehicle does not “significantly decrease” the inside heat nor the rising temperatures inside a car. Their report also indicates that the rate of heat rises incredibly fast inside a parked car.

According to NOAA, in only 10 minutes, the temperature inside a parked car can climb nearly 20 degrees. This is incredibly dangerous for any living being to be left alone in a car.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Association also shared its data. Even with cooler outdoor temps at 60 degrees Fahrenheit, a car has the potential to rise to 110 degrees. The Association also points out that since dogs are unable to sweat like people, a situation like this can end up deadly.

Another study published in the US National Library of Medicine Institutes of Health had similar findings. It shows that ambient temperature doesn’t matter. Instead, it purely comes down to whether the sun is out or not. So, even on a cool day, cars can become dangerously hot in a matter of minutes.

According to veterinary doctors, if someone leaves their dog in a parked car despite all the warnings out there and knowing it’s against California law, they will show signs of distress such as the following:

  • Agitation
  • Drooling
  • Excessive panting

And of course, if there were any diarrhea, vomiting, or the animal was not alert, this would be an immediate life-threatening emergency.

Avoid something like this which could have been prevented in the first place.

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